AMRA JV submits bid for Royal Australian Navy’s SEA1350 Phase 2

Australia-based Advanced Magnetic Ranges Australia Pty Limited (AMRA), a joint venture between marine technology firm AMOG and French naval technology specialist ECA Group, has submitted a bid for the Royal Australian Navy’s Magnetic Treatment Facility, known as project SEA1350 Phase 2.

According to Ben Clark, AMOG CEO, AMRA’s submission includes numerous Australian subcontractors and SMEs.

“Safety at sea is a continuous challenge since it is a hostile environment. Beyond the fact that AMRA’s solution is based on a tried, tested and approved method of ship protection through magnetic risk management such as deperming of submarines, our solution is a real technological breakthrough as it simplifies the process and reduces the time required,” Philippe Novelli, Chief Commercial Officer of the Robotics Division at ECA Group, said.

The navy’s Project SEA1350 Phase 2 is seeking to acquire and install an Overrun Magnetic Treatment Facility (MTF) capability, as well as the associated support systems required to sustain the capability until 2045.  Specifically, the Commonwealth is seeking to acquire an MTF solution that can deliver magnetic treatment to all current and future surface combatants and submarines.

Within the project, the navy aims to replace an existing deperming facility at Fleet Base West and is seeking an innovative ‘over-run’ solution that will deliver both time and cost savings to the Commonwealth. It replaces the traditional deperming process of wrapping the entire body of a ship or submarine in a massive wire coil and passing electricity through the coil to reduce the magnetic ‘signature’ of the vessel.

The AMRA approach instead uses wire coils laid down on the seabed, supported by a custom-designed subsea structure, through which a specific current form is passed as the vessel moves over the coils. This single day ‘over-run’ process provides a significant operational advantage when compared to the traditional wrapping, which can take up to 10 days.

Photo: AMRA

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